Make your own free website on Tripod.com

May 28, 2000

(Page 8 of 10)

hat2.JPG (12369 bytes)

Image #1

Is this another hat-shaped anomalous object?

Answer: It is a bird.

Image #2

"Hat-shaped" anomalous object in Image #1 cropped and enlarged.

Answer: A bird in flight.

hpuck.JPG (14052 bytes)

Image #3

Strange hockey puck object?

Answer: Bird.

hpucklg.jpg (3331 bytes)

Image #4

Image #3 of "hockey puck" object enlarged.

Answer: Enlarged image of a bird.

invisible1.JPG (19792 bytes)

Image #5

Invisible ship among contrails.

See below.

multiple.JPG (13913 bytes)

Image #6

Multiple light and dark objects filmed in, among and near spreading contrails.

Answer: These were birds that were no where near, in or among the contrails.

nearmiss.JPG (13502 bytes)

Image #7

Was this a near-miss between a projectile object on the left and the jet leaving a contrail on the right?

Answer: The "projectile" object was an insect caught flying in one direction while I filmed a plane flying in the other direction.

nearmissa.jpg (11235 bytes)

Image #8

Near miss?

Answer: No.  Bugs and planes do not fly at the same altitudes.  The insect was flying between the camera and the plane I was filming making it only seem like they were about to have a mid-air collision.

nearmissaemb.jpg (10974 bytes)

Image #9

Image #8 of "near miss" embossed.

projectile2a.jpg (19432 bytes)

Image #10

What is this rod doing in the contrails?  Do rods eat contrails? Are they yummy?

Answer: This is an insect that flew through the frame as I filmed a contrail overhead. The insect was between the camera lens and the contrail, closer to the camera and no where near the contrail which was at a much higher altitude.  I have never tasted a contrail so I do not know if they taste good or not.  There is no scientific data to support the hypothesis that "rods" eat contrails or that contrails taste yummy.

 

Answer to Image #5 of invisible ship among contrails:  

Can't see it?  That's because it's invisible, Silly!

Smile.  You're on Candid Camera. 

I have been studying Camouflage, Concealment and Deception since 1994 (wrote a book on this subject titled "The Pretenders" soon to be released).  By and large I have found that if you see an aircraft using camouflage, it's probably not camouflaged.  The use of camouflage is used to disguise or hide visibility.  This technique is rarely observed unless an object is meant to be seen.

2000 A. Hebert

All photographs, images and material presented on this page
are copyrighted material and may not be copied or printed without prior permission from A. Hebert.