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May 26, 2000

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discs1.jpg (7413 bytes)

Image #1

What are these glowing "flecks", "spheres" and "clutches" photographed using Solar Occlusion?

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees. (photograph)

discs1lg.jpg (5829 bytes)

Image #2

Enlarged Image #1 of glowing "flecks" and "spheres".

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

Note- pixel dropout around cotton seeds especially when enlarged.

Compare to images at:

http://tracers.8m.com/chains.htm

I took these photographs because the webmaster at "tracers.8m.com" (who lives in the same area as myself) called me and excitedly told me to go outside and photograph all the "flecks" and "spheres"  "all over the place".  When I got outside, I immediately recognized the "flecks" and "spheres" as cotton seeds from the Cotton Wood trees that proliferate in this area especially near the lake - Lake Lewisville.  The clouds of cotton seeds were so dense that I had to clean the air vents to my air conditioner twice a day to keep it from over-heating.

discs1lgneg.jpg (5824 bytes)

Image #3

Negative of enlarged Image #1 of  glowing "flecks" and "spheres".

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs1lgemb.jpg (5791 bytes)

Image #4

Enlarged Image #1 of  glowing "flecks" and "spheres" embossed.

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs1lgsol.jpg (7583 bytes)

Image #5

Enlarged Image #1 of glowing "flecks" and "spheres" solarized.

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs2.jpg (8019 bytes)

Image #6

Dozens of glowing "flecks" and "spheres" photographed using Solar Occlusion.

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

Note- the process of "solar occlusion" causes objects such as normal debris to seemingly glow by filming or photographing them beyond the context of a normal background.  Occluding the sun causes the camera lens to focus more on objects in the foreground and less on objects in the background thereby creating a somewhat false image of what was really being photographed.  When a photographer alters the natural setting when photographing objects in the air this must be taken into account when interpreting images which may appear in developed photographs and/or video footage.  Assuming these objects are UFO's or of unknown origins because they appear to "glow" or take on unusual characteristics is subjective and inaccurate analysis.

None of the objects (cotton seeds) in these photographs actually glowed (a subjective label).  They only appeared brighter in the resulting photographs due to the manipulation of the context in which they were photographed.  Nor were they "fleck-like" or "spheres" as in resembling flying disks or flying saucers (implied association).

discs2lg.jpg (6449 bytes)

Image #7

Enlarged image of dozens of white, glowing "flecks" and "spheres" photographed using Solar Occlusion.

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs2lgneg.jpg (6447 bytes)

Image #8

Negative of enlarged image of dozens of glowing "flecks" and "spheres" photographed using Solar Occlusion.

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs2lgemb.jpg (6161 bytes)

Image #9

Embossed and enlarged image of dozens of glowing "flecks" and "spheres" photographed using Solar Occlusion.

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs2lgsol.jpg (8831 bytes)

Image #10

Solarized and enlarged image of dozens of glowing "flecks" and "spheres" photographed using Solar Occlusion.

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs3.jpg (6753 bytes)

Image #11

More glowing "flecks" and "spheres" photographed using Solar Occlusion.

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs4.jpg (8095 bytes)

Image #12

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

discs5.jpg (7354 bytes)

Image #13

Answer: Debris - Cotton seeds from Cotton Wood trees.

2000 A. Hebert

All photographs, images and material presented on this page
are copyrighted material and may not be copied or printed without prior permission from A. Hebert.